A Reaction to Image Digitization Standards

After reading through suggested standards for scanning processes based on each type of material or object, I can thoroughly understand why institutions—despite enthusiasm for access and digital humanities—might shy away from long term and collection-wide scanning projects.

The Harry Ransom Center recently launched a digitization project entitled Continue reading “A Reaction to Image Digitization Standards”

Scalar Book of Coptic Stitch Binding

Our first digital project is due this week.  JJ asked us to create a collection of media objects in either Omeka or Scalar, using the built-in tools to play with footnotes, annotations, linking and adding metadata.

I chose Scalar, since Continue reading “Scalar Book of Coptic Stitch Binding”

Thinking about media and oral history annotation

This week we worked with several media annotation programs and studied oral history recording and transcription processes.

MEDIA ANNOTATION

Thinglink provides a handy means of annotating media for Continue reading “Thinking about media and oral history annotation”

Digital Art History: a first reaction

My first semester at Chapel Hill, in Carol Magee’s Art Historical Methods course, our class read “Is there a Digital Art History?” by Johanna Drucker [1].  Subsequently, I attended a session of the Digital Salon Series at UNC titled “What is Digital Art History?” in which we discussed our responses to the Drucker article and heard JJ Bauer and Carolyn Allmendinger reflect on their experience working in digital art history.  Now, in my second semester, JJ Bauer asks once more for consideration of the realities and possibilities of digital art history, this time for her course on Alternative Methods: Digital Art History. Continue reading “Digital Art History: a first reaction”