Modeling Roman Villas: How reconstruction choices influence understanding

For UNC Department of Classics professor Hérica Valladares’ Fall 2016 course on Roman Architecture, I decided to focus on how the type of model researchers choose to represent and recreate Roman Villas influence the conclusions they’re capable of or likely to find.  Continue reading “Modeling Roman Villas: How reconstruction choices influence understanding”

Experimenting with Microsoft Sway

The final project of our half semester course INLS 690-249: Intellectual Property and Copyright in Archives required us to learn how to create presentations in Microsoft Office Sway.

The app provides a vast array of Continue reading “Experimenting with Microsoft Sway”

Timemapping presentation

For our final presentations in JJ’s Digital Art History course, we were directed to put together a 5 minute presentation on our favourite projects from the semester, and I chose timemaps.  I didn’t make one this semester, but ran across them for another class and when building the timelines for this class.

To see the accompanying notes, click the gear underneath the presentation to select ‘Open Speaker Notes.’

Testing of Online Timeline Options

It’s a challenge to find a good timeline application.  In part, this is because timelines are so unwieldy to begin with.  But this is also due to the diversity of purposes for timelines.  Some folks want to track the life of one notable person (see Kelsey or Lauren’s post).  Others are looking to track the highlights of a period or topic (see Erin’s post).  Others still use timelines to track the development of a particular object or media (see Colin’s post).  I chose none of the above, and instead am tracking family history.  Continue reading “Testing of Online Timeline Options”

Digital Humanities vs Humanities?

This week our readings covered the digital humanities (and humanities generally) debate on instrumentalism vs criticism.  This idea that digital humanities is solely product-oriented, neglecting the traditional humanities’ concern with criticism is a divide with which I struggle.  Since JJ does display a critical approach, perhaps this is an artefact of her take on digital humanities.  But I’m inclined to think that this divide is an artificial wall we’ve constructed, rather than anything inherent in either DH or humanities. Continue reading “Digital Humanities vs Humanities?”

Open Access: Increasing participation in scholarship

I have spent majority of the past week discussing the value of education vs. degrees and the barriers a significant portion of the population face in obtaining the credentials and associations required for respected participation in scholarship. Continue reading “Open Access: Increasing participation in scholarship”

Pedagogy & Digital Media

When I heard Jaskot’s talk, I realized that I was missing out on a new and interesting approach to art history. I had previously used technology to record, organize, and even represent my work as part of a larger conventional framework. I had not used technology to help me better understand my work or to help me draw new conclusions.  —Nancy Ross, Dixie State University

This comment from Nancy Ross’ article “Teaching Twentieth Century Art History with Gender and Data Visualizations” gets at the heart of digital humanities research as we’ve understood it in this class.  For most scholars, digital humanity tools are a means of producing an accompanying visualization.  This neglects how digital humanity tools can actually serve as a new means of Continue reading “Pedagogy & Digital Media”

Folksonomies in the GLAM context

Folksonomies, also known as crowd sourced vocabularies, have proved their usefulness time and again in terms of deepening user experience and accessibility, especially in cultural heritage institutions.  Often termed GLAMs (Gallery, Library, Archive and Museum), these institutions can use folksonomies to tap into the knowledge base of their users to make their collections more approachable.

For example, Continue reading “Folksonomies in the GLAM context”

Google Maps as a means of enacting digital humanities

For our second assignment in JJ’s Digital Art History course, we created a map that would incorporate multiple layers and associated multimedia.  For my map, the layers represent the places in which I’ve lived.  The individual locations and routes represent oft frequented or well enjoyed locations. Continue reading “Google Maps as a means of enacting digital humanities”